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As The New York Times noted, however, cam models performing for a large online audience are sometimes blackmailed or threatened into performing acts they are not comfortable with.If they don't comply, they run the risk of having their real identity exposed to friends and family.Big spenders are also listed as the cam model's "favorites."Many models also have Amazon-like "wishlists" where fans can go and buy them things, whether it be a breast enlargement or a washing machine.Bartlett recalls finding one wishlist which included books of left-wing social criticism and a Black & Decker Dust Buster.ECPA was passed in 1986 as an amendment to the federal Wiretap Act, and, among other things, generally forbids the interception of electronic communications without the consent of a party to that communication. This definitional jig has meant webcam hacking victims are uncovered, with courts reluctant to take the sensible step of including webcam RAT spying under the act’s auspices.A leading case illustrating the problems with the “in-flight” ECPA approach is , still-pending federal litigation over RAT spying conducted by rent-to-own computer stores franchised by Aaron’s, Inc.

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There's a real threat of being watched and recorded where you live, and without your knowledge or consent.

Later, at the police station, according to court documents, the abuse continued, with the men now calling her disgusting while reading from her private instant message chats.

The laptop, it turned out, had been stolen before she bought it, and it came equipped with a Remote Access Tool, or RAT.

In the case of the government’s use of RATs against the public, the process is comically and characteristically opaque. As one of the authors of a recent policy paper reviewing the legal, technological, and policy issues surrounding RATs, I've given a lot of thought to the problem and how we can fix it.

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The federal government should clarify the definition of “interception” under Title I of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and reconsider the damages requirement for private claims in the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) in light of the often non-economic nature of privacy harms.

A victim’s suffering is often not financial but emotional.

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